Contextualization Annotated Bibliography

Annotated Bibliography on Contextualization

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"Contextualization of North American Theology." In Theology in the Americas, ed. by Sergio Torres and John Eagleson, 433-36. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1976.
Annotation: The future of North American theology concerns many people today, especially those who are preoccupied with the concepts of pluralism and the contextualization of theology. We hear about Latin American, African, and Asian theologies. What we call Western theology has been largely, if not exclusively, a European theology. This seems for many Christians the right time to develop more authentic North American theologies. Otherwise Christianity in the United States will lack the prophetic voice required of it by the ecumenical demands of today and the future. The context would include many different aspects and issues, one of which, by itself, is far-reaching. The U. S. dominates a large part of the world in economic and technological power. There must be a critical Christian word addressed to the great human issues that arise just from that fact. The American dream has been increasingly challenged in recent years. For many North Americans, U.S. history expressed in religious symbols is a covenant of freedom and democracy; for some people at home and many in the Third World, it is an enterprise of oppression, domination, and imperialism.
Topics:
Geographic location: North America
Area of Contextualization: 05f. Western Theologies


"Introduction." In Theology by the People: Reflections on Doing Theology in Community, ed. Samuel Amirtham and John S. Pobee, 1-26. Geneva: World Council of Churches, 1986.
Annotation: Introduces the book, a collection of papers from a conference held in 1985 in Mexico under the auspices of the Programme on Theological Education of the World Council of Churches. This article discusses issues related to "people's theology" including definitions, assumptions, types (Minjung, African, Black, Feminist) and implications.
Topics:
Geographic location: General
Area of Contextualization: 01. Introductions/Overviews


"Lines of Consensus for an Andean Theology." International Review of Mission 82:325 (January 1993): 57-62.
Annotation: Presents results from a conference of leaders of indigenous churches and organizations of Chile, Peru, Ecuador, and Bolivia. States concerns and expectations of an Andean theology, thoughts and concepts that under gird the thinking of an Andean theology, and recommendations, practices and projections for the future.
Topics:
Geographic location: Latin America
Area of Contextualization: 05c. Latin American Theologies


"The Seoul Declaration: Toward an Evangelical Theology for the Third World." International Bulletin of Missionary Research 7:2 (April 1983): 64-65.
Annotation: Eighty-two delegates and observers from Asia, Africa, Latin America, the Caribbean and the Pacific Islands met together in Seoul, Korea, from August 27 to September 5, 1982, in order to consider our theological task. Having as its central theme, "Theology and the Bible in Context," this consultation was organized with a fourfold purpose: (1) to deal with theological issues which are vitally related to evangelism and church growth and which are common to churches in developing countries; (2) to exchange ideas and information among evangelical theologians in the Third World; (3) to encourage fellowship and cooperation among these theologians; and (4) to learn from the church in Korea. The present document is a brief summary of our discussion.
Topics:
Geographic location: General
Area of Contextualization: 05g. Third World Theologies


Abe, G. O. "Theological Concepts of Jewish and African Names of God." Asia Journal of Theology 4:2 (1990): 424-429.
Annotation: Names are significant in both African and Hebrew contexts. This paper looks at names of God in Hebrew and various African contexts and compares them.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Abe, Gabriel Oyedele. "The Influence of Nigerian Music and Dance on Christianity." Asia Journal of Theology 5:2 (1991): 296-310.
Annotation: Music and dance are prominent and indispensable among the arts in Nigerian culture. This article examines the influence of Christianity on music and dance with respect to Christian beliefs and practices as demonstrated in the act of worship. Starts with OT, then ancient near east, then NT, then early missionary work in Nigeria, and finally contemporary setting.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 10c. Ministry--Music/Art


Abesamis, Carlos H. "Some Paradigms in Re-Reading the Bible in a Third-World Setting." Mission Studies 7:1 (1990): 21-34.
Annotation: This biblical reading is (a) occasioned by the pastoral challenges of the Third World situation, (b) therefore relevant for our Third World situation today and (c) yet faithful to the original meaning of the biblical texts. All this is part of our theological effort in the Philippines today.
Topics:
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 05g. Third World Theologies


Abeyasingha, Shanti "Contextualizing Theology in Sri Lanka: Some Reflections." Zeitschrift für Missionswissenschaft und Religionswissenschaft 66 (1982): 226-228.
Annotation: General thoughts on developing a contextualized theology in Sri Lanka, including issues of colonial history and religious syncretism (with four religions--Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam--present as well as an animistic foundation to which people turn in times of trouble). The author proposes that the reality of four centuries framed by religious syncretism, reflected on in faith, should be the starting point for any effort to contextualize theology.
Topics: Minjung;
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 05. Theology: General & Method


Abijole, Bayo. "St. Paul's Concept of Principalities and Powers in African Context." Africa Theological Journal 17:2 (1988): 118-29.
Annotation: Concept of world powers very much part of Paul's thinking and theology; this is explored and the relevance to the contemporary African context is discussed.
Topics: AICs;
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Aboagye-Mensah, Robert K. "Mission and Democracy in Africa: The Problem of Ethnocentrism." International Bulletin of Missionary Research 17:3 (July 1993): 130-33.
Annotation: Africa faces several massive obstacles as it embarks on its democratic experiment. One such problem--and the focus of this article--is ethnocentrism. My thesis is that the African church in its missionary witness has some positive contributions to make in addressing the problem of ethnocentrism. First, I define what I mean by the term "ethnocentrism." Second, I show briefly that the single-party system has failed to address the problem of ethnocentrism in Africa. Third, I point out some of the contributions that the African church has made in dealing with the issue of ethnocentrism, and what further contributions it can make in the democratization of the continent. My conclusion is that a faithful missionary witness of the church will have massive impact on the success of democracy in Africa.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 08. Social Dimension


Abogunrin, S. O. "The Total Adequacy of Christ in the African Context." Ogbomoso Journal of Theology 1 (January 1986): 9-16.
Annotation: The church in Africa today is concerned about indigenization and contextualization It needs to be equally concerned about the dangerous heresies of syncretism, of the direct and indirect denial of the uniqueness, power and adequacy of Christ, and of the denial of the completeness of our salvation in him and through him. The question of the uniqueness and total adequacy of Jesus Christ is given emphasis in every New Testament book. For reasons of space and relevance, however, we shall limit this discussion to two passages in Colossians (1:13-23; 2:8-3:5). The aim of this article is to examine the Colossian heresy and see how it relates to Christianity in Africa, with particular reference to the uniqueness of Christ, his conquest of principalities and powers and the fulness of the salvation provided for man once and for all by God through Christ's atoning death and resurrection.
Topics: Ancestors;
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Abraham, Dulcie, ed. Asian Women Doing Theology: Report from Singapore Conference, November 20-29, 1987. Kowloon, Hong Kong: Asian Women's Resource Centre for Culture and Theology, 1989.
Annotation:
Topics:
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 12. Books


Abraham, Dulcie. "Jesus the New Creation: Christology in the Malaysian Context." In Asian Women Doing Theology: Report from Singapore Conference, November 20-29, 1987, ed. Dulcie Abraham, 189-94. Kowloon, Hong Kong: Asian Women's Resource Centre for Culture and Theology, 1989.
Annotation: This theme paper on Jesus, the New Creator, aims at demonstrating the significance of this new creation for us women in Asia, and indeed for all of humanity and creation. 1) The paper begins with a brief look at the Old Testament account of both the creative and destructive forces at work in the world, with particular reference to both the oppression and empowerment of women; 2) The gospel writers, both the synoptic and the fourth evangelist proclaim the healing and empowering work of Jesus, the new creation; 3: Paul experienced and proclaimed the new life in Jesus to both Jews and Gentiles; 4) The paper then goes on to suggest that the Church fathers as well as Church leaders today have only understood very partially the meaning of the New Creation inaugurated by Jesus; 5) In conclusion there is the challenge to Asian women today to recognize and appropriate for themselves the freedom and joy of this New Creation in Jesus.
Topics: Ancestors;
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 05b. Asian Theologies


Abraham, K. C. "Asian Theology Looking to 21st Century." Voices (1997): 81-98.
Annotation: Asian theologies are contextual theologies; they are also people's theologies. Being truly rooted in the Asian realties they are given different names such as: Theology of Struggle, Minjung Theology, Dalit Theology, and there are women's (Feminist) theologies, They reflect on the deeper yearnings of their religions and cultures, critically rejecting some and reaffirming others. In the past, the Asian churches, by an large, a product of western missions, were content with repeating, without reflection, the confessions of faith evolved by the Western churches. Creative theologies in Asia began to emerge in the 19th century when the churches started relating their faith to the questions and concerns peculiar to Asia. This theological encounter continues as the Church faces new problems and challenges. We have embarked on a new journey, breaking the tutelage of our erstwhile Western masters. A new stage in this journey has begun as we are on the threshold of 21st century. How do we articulate our agenda for the future?
Topics: Christology;Inculturation;Liberation;Urban;
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 05b. Asian Theologies


Abraham, K. C. "Dalit Theology--Some Tasks Ahead." Bangalore Theological Forum 29:1/2 (March & June 1997): 36-47.
Annotation: By far the most significant contribution from India to the present-day contextualized theological thinking comes from Dalit theology and the late Prof. A. P. Nirmal was its most articulate spokesperson. This paper is a tribute to him in which the author reiterates some of the cardinal elements of Dalit theology, especially as they are reflected in the writings of Nirmal and then suggests some tasks ahead.
Topics: Christology;
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 05b. Asian Theologies


Abraham, K. C. "Emerging Concerns of Third World Theology." Bangalore Theological Forum 26:3/4 (September & December 1994): 3-14.
Annotation: The emphasis on praxis as the basis for theological reflection gives the various contextual theologies a common method of approach. This methodology distinguishes Third World Theology from other theologies. Today we face a new Third World situation, and newer challenges are brought to contextual theologies. This presentation is an attempt to highlight some of them and ask whether there is a marked shift in their methodology.
Topics:
Geographic location: General
Area of Contextualization: 05g. Third World Theologies


Abraham, K. C., ed. Third World Theologies: Commonalities and Divergences: Papers and Reflections from the Second General Assembly of the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians, December 1986, Oaxtepec, Mexico. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1990.
Annotation:
Topics:
Geographic location:
Area of Contextualization: 12. Books


Abraham, M. V. "The Teaching of Biblical Theology in India Today." The Indian Journal of Theology 29:3,4 (July-Dec. 1980): 124-132.
Annotation: In the first part of this essay the author outlines the origin, development and the present state of biblical theology in the West as well as some of the problems that biblical theology poses. In the second section he attempts to state briefly how relevant biblical theology is for India and how it should address itself to the Indian context. He identifies the two major contexts in India which have to be reckoned with when we speak of developing and teaching biblical theology in India: (1) the religio-cultural context; (2) the socio-economic context.
Topics:
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 05b. Asian Theologies


Ackermann, Denise. "Engaging Freedom: A Contextual Feminist Theology of Praxis." Journal of Theology for Southern Africa 94 (March 1996): 32-49.
Annotation: My purpose in this paper is to explore the contribution of a feminist theology of praxis in which the notion of 'liberating praxis' is a central concern to the present South African context. The actual histories of living women and other marginalized and oppressed people struggling against race, gender and class oppressions are an important source for my reflections.
Topics: Inculturation;Urban;
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Ackermann, Denise. "Faith and Feminism: Women Doing Theology." In Doing Theology in Context: South African Perspectives, ed. John W. de Gruchy and Charles Villa-Vicencio, 197-211. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 1994.
Annotation: Years ago, as part of the collect in a eucharistic service, I was asked to pray that I might grow to my full manhood'. This simple request jarred me into a new consciousness. What was happening?. The prayers were led by male priests; God was addressed almost exclusively as 'Father'; in the hymns we sang lustily about 'sons' or 'men' of God; and the sermon was preached by a man who relied for his interpretation of Scripture on men's experience of the world around us. There have been changes. However, nearly two thousand years of a male dominated church, backed by theology that is derived from male scholarship and experience, cannot be dealt with simply by ordaining women or a commitment to inclusive language, important as such steps may be. Profound changes are required. Feminist theology is one of the vehicles through which women express a critique of existing theology and religious practices, and contribute creatively towards the unfinished dimension of theology.
Topics: Urban;
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05g. Third World Theologies


Ada, Mary Juliana and Isichei, Elizabeth. "Perceptions of God in the Churches in Obudu." Journal of Religion in Africa 7:3 (1975): 165-73.
Annotation: One of the most interesting and least studied dimensions of Christianity in contemporary Africa concerns the way in which the churches are actually perceived at the grassroots level, in the villages. How are the various denominations seen, by those within, and without? How do traditionalists see the Christian presence, and define their own role in relationship to, it? The essay which follows seeks to shed some light on these questions, in a case study drawn from Obudu, one of the most remote areas in Nigeria. It is not presented as "typical"--though some of the responses may well be. Each such study must exist, as it were, in inverted commas. One must begin by delineating at least fragments of the context--in this case, the Obudu cultural inheritance, and the particular forms of mission activity which impinged on it.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 11. Case Studies


Adams, Daniel J. "Ancestors, Folk Religion, and Korean Christianity." In Perspectives on Christianity in Korea and Japan: The Gospel and Culture in East Asia, ed. Mark R. Mullins and Richard Fox Young, 95-114. Lewiston, NY: Edwin Mellen Press, 1995.
Annotation: In this brief study we shall examine ancestor rites as practiced in Korea with a view toward showing how Korean Christians have dealt with this issue in their churches. That there is considerable difference of opinion among Korean Christians concerning this issue suggests there is more than one way of approaching the problem of ancestor rites. Indeed, there are actually two levels of participation in the rites--the Confucian, or more precisely Neo-Confucian, and that of shamanism, the prevailing folk religion of Korea. The intertwining of these two levels of participation has given rise to a misunderstanding of ancestor rites among the churches, beginning with the earliest Christian contacts in the late 1700s and continuing into the present. This misunderstanding has been the cause of intense persecution, suffering, and death, and continues to be the source of considerable controversy. One way of correcting this misunderstanding is to think of ancestor rites in terms of theoretical constructs, in this case making a distinction between espoused theories and theories-in-use The Neo-Confucian practice of ancestor rites as veneration is the espoused theory; the shamanistic practice of ancestor rites as worship is the theory-in-use. This distinction is important for understanding the complex relationship between ancestors, folk religion, and Korean Christianity in both its Catholic and Protestant forms.
Topics: AICs;
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 08. Social Dimension


Adams, Daniel J. "From Certainty to Uncertainty: Doing Theology in the Postmodern Era." In From East to West: Essays in Honor of Donald G. Bloesch, ed. Adams, Daniel J., 131-49. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1997.
Annotation: The various cultures of the world are based upon religious traditions and value systems that are very different from the Christianity of the West. Indeed, the secularization of the West is a minority situation among the cultures of the world. The postmodern era will mean a coming to terms with this reality as more and more nations and cultures increase their economic, political and military strength. According to Samuel Huntington, "this will require the West to develop a much more profound understanding of the basic religious and philosophical assumptions. " How shall we understand these basic religious and philosophical assumptions, and how will this understanding contribute to our doing theology in the postmodern age? A good place to begin is to consider several of these assumptions and how they have influenced recent theology. We shall consider the premodern theology of J. Gresham Machen, the modem theology of Edward W. Farley, and the postmodem theology of Chung Hyun-Kyung, and in so doing we shall not only come to a more thorough understanding of ourselves, but hopefully a better understanding of others as well.
Topics:
Geographic location: North America
Area of Contextualization: 05f. Western Theologies


Adams, Daniel J. "Reflections on an Indigenous Movement: The Yoido Full Gospel Church." The Japan Christian Quarterly 57:1 (Winter 1991): 36-45.
Annotation: A number of questions arise about the huge numerical success of the Yoido Full Gospel Church. Why has this church been so successful? Who is Cho Yonggi, and how did he become the pastor of the largest Protestant church in the world? Is the Yoido Full Gospel Church an indigenous form of Christianity, or is it a new religious movement? Is it possible to transfer its religious belief and practice to other countries, such as Japan?
Topics: Dalit;
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 10a. Ministry--Church Planting/Models


Adams, Daniel J. "The Sources of Minjung Theology." Taiwan Journal of Theology 9 (1987): 179-198.
Annotation: The period from the mid-1970's until the present has seen the rise of numerous contextual theologies. There is perhaps no area of the world, where contextual theology has flourished like that of Asia, f or it was here that the concept of contextual theology was originally developed. One of the most unique of these theologies is also one of the least known-the minjung theology of Korea. To date there are only a few works on minjung theorlogy in languages other than Korea. Within Korea however, there is an ever-growing number of works dealing with minjung theology in the vernacular. Because minjung theology is a significant theological movement within Korea, it is imperative that Christians in other Asian contexts have at least a basic understanding of what minjung theology is.
Topics: Liberation;
Geographic location: Asia
Area of Contextualization: 05b. Asian Theologies


Adams, Daniel J. "Theological Method: Four Contemporary Models." Taiwan Journal of Theology 3 (1981): 193-205.
Annotation: Contemporary theology is characterized by four basic methodologies: systematic theology with its concern for the dogmatic task; philosophical theology with an emphasis upon the apologetic task; political theology with its stress upon the ethical task; and contextual theology with its focus upon the hermeneutical task. Each of these methodologies is operationalized by a number of models. These include the Reformed dogmatics model of G C Berkouwer (systematic theology); the process theology model of John B Cobb, Jr. and David Ray Griffin (philosophical theology); the liberation theology model as presented by Robert McAfee Brown (political theology); and the "third-eye" theology model of C S Song (contextual theology). Due to theological pluralism these models often overlap, however each must be taken in account, especially within the Asian context. Although the age of the theological giants is past, contemporary theology possesses a vitality which continues to influence the theological scene of which we are a part.
Topics:
Geographic location: General
Area of Contextualization: 05. Theology: General & Method


Adams, Daniel J., ed. From East to West: Essays in Honor of Donald G. Bloesch. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1997.
Annotation:
Topics:
Geographic location: General
Area of Contextualization: 12. Books


Adeney, Bernard T. Strange Virtues: Ethics in Multicultural World. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1995.
Annotation:
Topics:
Geographic location:
Area of Contextualization: 12. Books


Adeney, Miriam Ann. "What is 'Natural' About Witchcraft and Sorcery?" Missiology 2:3 (July 1974): 377-95.
Annotation: Explores some of the more "natural" (e.g., social, psychological, economic, etc.) causes of witchcraft and sorcery without denying the reality of supernatural involvement.
Topics:
Geographic location: General
Area of Contextualization: 08. Social Dimension


Adeney, Miriam. "Esther across Cultures: Indigenous Leadership Roles for Women." Missiology 15:3 (July 1987): 323-37.
Annotation: Women have unique qualities that allow them to work effectively in Christian ministry among their own people and cross-culturally. Catherine Booth and Mary Slessor are historical models. Today women throughout the world continue to model resourceful ministry roles. Evelyn Quema, an evangelist and church planter in the Philippines, is an example, as are So Yan Pui who, before her recent death, was involved in writing and parachurch work in Hong Kong, and Ayako Miura, a Japanese novelist. For these women, who are often better educated than their peers, opportunities for ministry are plentiful, but there are also outreach opportunities for oppressed women, and they too are serving as models in ministry.
Topics: Urban;
Geographic location: General
Area of Contextualization: 08. Social Dimension


Adeyemo, Tokunboh. "African Contribution to Christendom." Scriptura 39(1991): 89-93.
Annotation: There is a myth out there that asserts that since the church in Africa is financially poor, there isn't anything it can offer to the rest of the church worldwide. This is untrue. I shall delineate some of the African religious wealth the church in Africa can contribute to Christendom. In this article Christianity in Africa is deemed to be making six contributions to world Christianity. Although the church in Africa is poor, it has much to offer by way of its holistic world view, people-centredness, community orientation, expressive worship, adaptability in mission, and the will to cooperate. The latter is seen particularly in the flourishing of the ecumenical association of evangelicals in Africa,
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Adeyemo, Tokunboh. "An African Leader Looks at the Churches' Crises." Evangelical Missions Quarterly 14:3 (July 1978): 151-60.
Annotation: In his article, the new head of the Association of Evangelicals of Africa and Madagascar describes both external and internal crises facing the churches of Africa. He examines various current ideas from many sources, especially ''New African Theology. " At the same time, he outlines reasons for being hopeful about the future of evangelicals.
Topics: Dalit;
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Adeyemo, Tokunboh. "Contemporary Issues in Africa and The Future of Evangelicals." Evangelical Review of Theology 2:1 (April 1978): 2-14.
Annotation: The search for identity sets the tone for a proper understanding of contemporary events in Africa; this article examines four major expressions of this crisis and then discusses issues related to the future of evangelicalism.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 02. Culture & Contextualization


Adeyemo, Tokunboh. "Ideas of Salvation." Africa Journal of Evangelical Theology 16:1 (1997): 67-75.
Annotation: Outlines various approaches to salvation found in world religions, including ATRs and the Christian faith.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Adeyemo, Tokunboh. "Search for Theological Expression for the Church in Africa." Perception 13 (July 1978): 1-4.
Annotation: Speaking generally, the church usually undergoes five cycles of growth in theological formulation: 1) The evangelistic or kerygmatic stage wherein after the Word has been proclaimed and conversions made, the first fruits are gathered in for worship and constituted as cultic community. 2) Next, these converts are taken through the various catechetical schools for teaching and indoctrination. 3) As the teaching is done, efforts are made to put the literature in local languages (i.e., paraphrase). Commonly, this takes poetic form to aid memorization and dissemination. 4) With growth comes myriads of problems both from within and without. At this stage, apologists arise to write a defense of the faith and steadily contend it. 5) The final stage deals with putting together the beliefs and teaching of the church in systematic form. This credo stage may take various patterns including dogmatic theology, systematic theology, historical theology, etc. Sometimes theology is born out of confrontation, consultation and resolution. Looking at the churches in Africa, we find ourselves still struggling to stand at the third base (i.e., the poetic stage), and simultaneously stretching to reach both the fourth and the fifth base.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05. Theology: General & Method


Adeyemo, Tokunboh. "The African Church and Selfhood." Evangelical Review of Theology 5:2 (October 1981): 212-223.
Annotation: From Acts 15, should the Gentiles be circumcised in order to become Christians? or should the Jews be Hellenized so as to be Christians? This is the question that churchmen in Africa are asking today. Before we can worship Jesus Christ the Lord, do we have to be European Christians? Does God understand our Yoruba or Swahili language if we address Him in that language? These are some of the questions that selfhood raises and that are addressed in this article. Sections include the crisis of selfhood, the language of selfhood, the dynamics of selfhood, the expressions of selfhood, the implications of selfhood, and the values of selfhood.
Topics: Dalit;
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Adeyemo, Tokunboh. "Towards an Evangelical African Theology," Evangelical Review of Theology 7:1 (April 1983): 147-54.
Annotation: In this essay our attention is focused not so much on the questions of, how, where, what and who should do theology for the Church in Africa as on the discipline itself. Because of this, we have given more space to part two of the paper than to its first part. Nevertheless part one is necessary since it serves as compass in the task before us.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 05a. African Theologies


Adiku, E. T. "Settling Disputes Among the Ewe." Missiology 1:2 (April 1973): 67-70.
Annotation: Descriptions of emic approaches among the Ewe to settling disputes with reflections on application for the Christian worker.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 06. Ethical Dimension


Adogbo, Michael P. "A Comparative Analysis of Prophecy in Biblical and African Traditions." Journal of Theology for Southern Africa 88 (September 1994): 15-20.
Annotation: There is a general impression, especially among the Jewish translators and ardent adherents of Christianity, that Israelite prophecy was something special and unique and, therefore, it cannot be compared with other forms of revelation as manifested in other religions. The primary objective of this paper is to examine the phenomenon of prophecy in the Bible and to show that the motives stood in some kind of relation to the greater human culture, especially the African traditions.
Topics:
Geographic location: Africa
Area of Contextualization: 09. Experiential Dimension